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IELTS Energy English Podcast | IELTS English Speaking Practice 7+ | IELTS Test Strategy | IELTS English Writing Tips

Do you want to get a band 7 on the IELTS exam? IELTS English exam preparation doesn’t have to be hard or boring! It can be fun! Lindsay and Jessica from All Ears English are back with a new way to help you achieve the IELTS score you need for the General or the Academic exam! We’ll give you IELTS strategies, practice, tips, tricks, and secrets using real English examples. We’ll show you how to take control of the IELTS Speaking Section by reducing anxiety, panic, and fear. You’ll learn what to do when your mind goes blank, how to organize your thoughts and how to use intonation, English pronunciation and native English vocabulary such as phrasal verbs and idioms to impress the IELTS examiner. You’ll find out which grammar points you should use in the IELTS Speaking Test and which ones you should avoid to get a band 7. You’ll also get guidance on how to prepare for IELTS Writing Task 1 and IELTS Writing Task 2 with help on the opinion essay, graphs and charts, and the argument or discursive essay. You’ll get tips on how to succeed with IELTS listening comprehension strategies and how to get the highest possible score on the IELTS reading test. You’ll find out how to use IELTS practice tests to get the maximum score increase to go from a 5 or 6 to a 7 or higher. We’ll show you the common mistakes that most students make on IELTS test day, what to expect on the day of the exam, and how the exam is structured. You’ll get the best possible IELTS resource recommendations from Jessica Beck who has taught IELTS for more than 10 years. IELTS Energy is perfect for you if you want to move from a band 5 or a 6 to a band 7 or higher. Prepare for IELTS with Lindsay and Jessica! We will answer your IELTS questions directly so please join us and send in your questions. Join us to get the score you need and have fun doing it! Get motivated for the IELTS exam with IELTS Energy!
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Now displaying: March, 2015
Mar 27, 2015

Get our free IELTS Cheat Sheet: http://www.allearsenglish.com/evaluation

Get a summary of today's episode: http://allearsenglish.com/aee-ielts-unfamilar-speaking-question-un-freeze-speaking-section/

What's your target score on the Speaking test? Come back to our site and let us know!

Mar 26, 2015

Nervous about the IELTS Speaking test? Get our free IELTS Cheat Sheet and learn what the Examiner wants: http://www.allearsenglish.com/evaluation

Get a summary of today's episode here: http://allearsenglish.com/aee-ielts-attack-writing-task-2/

Tell us what your target score is and when your next exam date is.

Mar 25, 2015

Get our free IELTS Cheat Sheet: http://www.allearsenglish.com/evaluation

 

Get a summary of today's episode: http://allearsenglish.com/aee-ielts-anxious-nervous-scared-go-happy-place-comes-ielts/

 

Come back to our site and leave a comment. Let's have a conversation about the IELTS! Let us know your next test date. We are here to support you.

Mar 24, 2015

Find out what the Examiner wants on the Speaking test: http://www.allearsenglish.com/evaluation

Here is the summary of today's show: http://allearsenglish.com/aee-ielts-resources-like-preparation-need/

 

Mar 23, 2015

Get our free IELTS Cheat Sheet! Find out what the examiner wants on the speaking test: http://www.allearsenglish.com/evaluation

Get a summary of this episode here: http://allearsenglish.com/aee-ielts-how-to-beat-writing-task-1-on-the-ielts/

Come back to our site and ask us your IELTS question!

We want to have a conversation with you.

 

 

 

Mar 19, 2015

Come back to our blog and have a conversation with us!

http://allearsenglish.com/ielts-writing-time-strategy/

Also get our IELTS Cheat Sheet to find out what the Examiner wants on the Speaking test: http://www.allearsenglish.com/evaluation

 

Are you getting ready for your IELTS exam?

One big challenge on the IELTS is timing on the Writing test.

Today we’ll help you with a great time-management strategy.

You have a total of 60 minutes to do the whole Writing test. Task 2 is 250 words and Task 1 is 150 words so you need to spend more time on Writing Task 2.

We recommend 20 minutes for Task 1 and 40 minutes for Task 2.

However, don’t start with Writing Task 2. Do Task 1 first.

You also need to allow time for planning.

It really depends on you and how you prefer to write but we recommend that you practice and see what’s right for you in terms of planning time.

As a general guideline, you could spend 4 minutes planning and then spend a few minutes after to check your work.

When you practice brainstorming and coming up with ideas in the planning step, don’t forget to write down everything you think of.

In Task 2, spend 5 minutes planning, 30 minutes writing, 5 minutes to check.

You need to practice the timing for all of these steps and adjust it based on what you need.

 

Practice is the key with time management.

The biggest mistakes that people make with time management on IELTS Writing is when they skip both planning and checking at the end.

When you check, look for spelling, grammar, vocabulary, etc.

Listen to this episode to learn more about how to check your own IELTS Writing test.

 

What other questions do you have about IELTS Writing?

Let us know in the comments below.

Mar 18, 2015

Did you know that being imaginative and creative can get you a 7 on the IELTS exam?

This is especially true when it comes to the IELTS Speaking test. Your ideas don’t need to be 100% realistic. What’ more important is the way you deliver your ideas. You can make stuff up and have fun with it!

Today we’ll show you how!

What should you do when you get a Speaking question about the future and you don’t know how to answer the question?

You need to open your mind and be willing to make up your own ideas quickly.

In Part 3 of the Speaking test, they often ask you to guess or predict the future. For example, they might ask, “How might the way people travel change in the future?” With this question you need to make up a creative answer.

A good response is this: “I predict that by 2025 we will all be riding in flying cars.”

This is also useful because when you make up a funny idea, it makes you laugh, which makes you relax and makes you speak more like a real person.

This will also help your vocabulary because you will end up using less common vocabulary when you make up ideas about the future.

If you aren’t used to coming up with your own ideas or if you haven’t learned this in school you can train your mind to be creative.

You already have the ability but you just need to practice it.

Creativity is a muscle.

Flex your imagination!

Try this:

Look at the news and look at the topics in the newspaper. Come up with a prediction for each article headline that you read. Predict what will happen with that specific topic in the future.

Try to entertain the Examiner.

The Examiner is going to give you your score right after Part 3 of the Speaking so it’s good to leave them on a funny and positive note because this could influence your overall Speaking score.

If you are already a naturally funny person then you should amplify that in the Speaking test.

Don’t be afraid of your own ideas and your own personality.

If you are enjoying yourself during the test then your Examiner is probably having fun too.

Do you have other questions about the Speaking test?

Let us know in the comments below.

Mar 17, 2015

Are you nervous about the IELTS Speaking test?

Most people get super nervous about this part of the test!

Part of why you are nervous is because you don’t know what kind of questions to expect from the Examiner.

Today we’re going to show you what questions the Examiner is likely to ask on the Speaking test.

 

We’re also going to show you how to prepare for these questions.

On Part 1 of the Speaking test you will always have to talk about:

  • Work
  • Study
  • Home

 

 Sample questions for Speaking Part 1:

  • Do you like your apartment?
  • Are there many shops near your apartment?
  • What are you studying? Why did you choose this subject? What will you do when you finish?
  • Clothes
  • Driving a car
  • Excercise
  • Food
  • Health
  • School- what do you remember about your high school? Who was your favorite teacher? What do you like to read? Do you enjoy reading before you go to bed?

 

** Remember! You can’t give one-word answers. You must expand on your ideas. Give complete sentences or you will get marked down.

When the Examiner asks, “What are you studying?” don’t say “English” instead you can say “At the moment I am studying English at the university downtown.

You can practice Part 1 with a language exchange partner.

 

Speaking Part 2 and Speaking Part 3:

Questions in Part 2 and Part 3 will always be linked to each other.

Topic: Movies

Part 2: Describe your favorite movie (who, what, when, where, why). You can practice this part by yourself to get comfortable speaking for two minutes.

Part 3: What makes a movie successful? Do you think the director or the actors are more important?

For part 3, you should have 3 things in your answer:

  • Give your opinion
  • Give an example of your opinion
  • Give a concluding sentence

When you prepare for the test, you should write out your answers ahead of time. Later, when you get comfortable with that you can stop writing them out and get better at responding quickly.

Remember, planning ahead and preparing is the key to getting more confidence.

Final tip- check out the NY Times and look at the newspaper sections- those are typical IELTS Speaking topics.

 What other questions do you have for the Speaking test?

Please ask us in the comments below!

Mar 12, 2015

Click here to get 7 Easy Steps to a 7 or Higher on IELTS

 

Today find out how to get a 7 on all 4 sections of the IELTS!

In the Speaking Section:

The examiner looks for four things:

 

  • Fluency and coherence: Use linking words, don’t pause, don’t repeat yourself
  • Vocabulary: Use a few slang words, a few idioms, a few phrasal verbs- get away from the textbook
  • Grammar: It’s hard to get a 7 in grammar. The only way you can do it is if most of your sentences don’t have mistakes but it’s ok not to get a 7 in grammar because the score is an average. Think about where your strengths are and if they are not in grammar then focus on other areas.
  • Pronunciation: This is the easiest one to get a 7. You can do it! Show some personality. Use some intonation. Use drama! You don’t need “perfect English pronunciation.”

The Writing Section:

  • Task 1: Task achievement- you have to include all of the important numbers and you have to have an overall trend. For example, “Overall, numbers increase in this period.”
  • Task 2: They grade you on task response. Did you answer the question? Answer every single part of the question. Also, cohesion and coherence are important. Use linking words and have clear paragraphs. Have an obvious main idea.
  • Vocabulary: You need to use academic phrases and academic linking words.
  • Grammar: It’s hard to get a 7 on this. You need a variety of sentence structures and not a lot of mistakes.

 

The Reading and Listening Sections:

  • At least 27 correct answers out of 40 will get you an “acceptable” score

 

Now you know exactly what you need to do to get a 7 on all 4 sections of the IELTS.

Now go get started on your preparation and you will be ready to get that 7!

Let us know your questions in the comments section.

Mar 11, 2015

Click here to get 7 Easy Steps to a 7 or Higher on IELTS

 

Today you’ll get 3 sentence structures to improve your grammar grade on IELTS Writing Task 1.

On IELTS Task 1 you are shown a graph, table, pie chart, or bar chart. They have numbers and you have to compare and contrast how they change.

You will see a graph that shows “Change Over Time”

The examiner wants you to use different sentence structures for this category.

 

Here they are:

1) Subject + verb + adverb : “The numbers increased dramatically in 2008.”

2) There was + adjective + noun: “There was a dramatic increase in 2008.”

3) Before +verb-ing: “Before increasing in 2008, the number of surfers experienced a decline.”

 

Where can you find graphs to use to practice these sentences?

  • Find IELTS forums
  • Go to IELTS.org
  • Go to a bookstore and write down some sentences with your notebook
  • New York Times and USA Today
  • Google Images, type in “bar chart” or “pie chart”

 

Where else have you found resources like pie charts or graphs to practice these sentence structures for Writing Task 1?

Let us know your ideas below!

 

 

Mar 10, 2015

Click here to get 7 Easy Steps to a 7 or Higher on IELTS

 

Are you nervous about your IELTS Speaking test?

Did you know that there are some easy things that you can do to increase your chances of a higher score on the Speaking test?

The IELTS exam is not completely objective because another person is giving you the score.

Yes, they are trained and there are very specific requirements for each score but they are still human and you can influence the examiner in a positive way to increase your score.

How to build a rapport with the examiner or get their attention:

  • Don’t shake the examiner’s hand. This is not a business deal.
  • Do follow their instructions about where to sit and be respectful.
  • Don’t try to negotiate with the examiner to get a better score.
  • Don’t ask the examiner how you did right after the speaking test is over. The final few minutes before you leave the room are very important so don’t make the examiner angry.
  • Do use your personality. Do Tell personal stories. Don’t say what you think the examiner wants to hear.
  • Do relax, smile, laugh a little bit.
  • Do be polite.
  • Do make eye contact if you can. If you can’t do that then you can look beyond the examiner.

 

Approach the Speaking section like a formal interview but also show a positive attitude.

It’s supposed to be formal but relaxed.

 

Do you have any other questions about the Speaking test on the IELTS?

Please ask your question below.

Mar 6, 2015

Click here to get 7 Easy Steps to a 7 or Higher on IELTS

 

Are you nervous about talking for two minutes in speaking section 2 of the IELTS?

Today, get some note taking strategies you can use to ace the IELTS speaking section!

 

In the IELTS speaking part 1, the examiner asks you about three topics.  But in part 2 you are given a single topic card.  No matter what this topic is, you cannot change it. You have one minute to prepare to speak for two full minutes. How you spend that minute is important.

Because you will have such a specific topic, and such a short amount of time, it’s probably best to write everything you can think of about the topic.  You could do this in a bullet list, or as a mind map.  But you need to have enough to say for those two minutes.

If you do not have practice brainstorming like this, you may want to practice.  Use a topic from a newspaper as an example. Give yourself a minute (or more) to make a list of notes on the topic.  Then, see if you can use them to speak for two minutes.

 

Other tips:

  • Practice brainstorming/note-taking every day if possible.  You’re training your brain for thinking, speaking and writing in English.
  • Take all of these notes in English, not your native language!
  • Ideally, your notes will provide you enough to tell a story. Telling a story will enable you to speak for the full two minutes, and help you remain coherent.

 

Do you have much experience brainstorming?

How do you think it would go for the IELTS speaking section part 2?

Let us know in the comments section below!

Mar 4, 2015

Click here to get the 7 Easy Steps to a 7 or Higher on IELTS

 

What’s the difference between the IELTS and the TOEFL?

Today, learn what makes these two tests distinct, and how to choose between the them!

 

The IELTS and the TOEFL have some significant differences.  But that doesn’t mean one is easier than the other.  Many universities will accept either test, so you might be able to choose which one works best for you.  That means it’s a good idea to know how each is unique.

 

Here is are some points of difference between the two tests:

  • The IELTS exam is completed on paper and by speaking to a person. The TOEFL is done entirely on a computer (even the speaking portion).  For some people, IELTS might feel more “natural.”
  • The listening section in TOEFL uses only North American accents.  IELTS, on the other hand, uses a range of English accents from around the world.  If you have trouble with accents, you might find IELTS more difficult.
  • But IELTS is more predictable.  For example, the test has three reading passages every time.  TOEFL, on the other hand, always has a different number of reading passages.  It also might have longer listening and reading sections.
  • With TOEFL, on one section you have to listen to a conversation and give your opinion.  This means it’s both a writing and speaking section.  IELTS only has distinct listening and reading sections.

 

Which exam sounds easier to you?

Let us know why in the comments section below!

Mar 2, 2015

Click here to get the 7 Easy Steps to a 7 or Higher

 

How can you increase your IELTS vocabulary range? 

Today, learn 3 steps for building a more dynamic vocabulary for the IELTS exam!

 

You need to have words that are useful for academia and formal situations, but also with your friends on the street. This is key to having a more natural sounding English. But how do you build this range of vocabulary?

 

Jessica has three steps for building it.  They include:

Getting the vocabulary: Newspapers are a great resource for this.  A newspaper like the USA Today is more understandable, while the New York Times is written at a higher level.  A magazine like the Economist is even higher.

Recording it: For every article you read, choose maybe five new words to learn.  Keep them in context. Maybe write a summary of the article that uses these new words.

Remembering it: Develop a system for studying these new vocabulary words.  Try to review the words at least two or three times a week. Also, try to use these new words in conversation.

 

What are you doing to build a range of vocabulary?

Tell us what you’re doing in the comments section below!

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